On credibility and using your title

The other day I was in a training where we talked about how you can influence other people and we revisited Aristotle's pathos, ethos and logos triangle on persuading people (google it if you want to know more). One point of this triangle, the ethos part, is about credibility and trust, and in this training we talked about what that could look like. It made me realize that for some, credibility comes easier than for others, because some people may look more like what society finds credible than others. For example, I've heard people say that I look young, and not much like a scientist, so I guess I need to bring other ways of establishing credibility than someone who does look like your stereotypical scientist. Also, that stereotypical scientist can afford himself the luxury of coming into work in shorts and sandals and still look credible, while his female counterpart has a much narrower definition of what she can wear to be assumed credible.

Another aspect of credibility for scientists is your Dr. title. I've heard many people say that there is no need to use your title, and especially in The Netherlands there is a culture where people tend to be very informal. But if you can't use your title to bring credibility, for example when you're teaching, then how are you supposed to do that when you don't have the stereotypical "credible looks"? And wouldn't a really strong way for white men to be allies to women (or people of color, or anyone else who does not come with the stereotypical credible looks) to start using titles again, even in a society that is informal and scores relatively high on the gender equality lists? Would this be one way we could counter the "gender equality paradox in STEM?"

 

 

3 responses so far

  • ABD says:

    I was once informed by someone knowledgeable about diplomatic procedure that Professor carries a slightly higher distinction than Doctor, as Professor denotes an academic authority responsible for teaches, while Doctor simply denotes that the person named holds a PhD. I suspect the basic idea behind this is that there are more PhDs than Professors.

    • babyattachmode says:

      Yes and there are country-differences here too: in The Netherlands only full professors are called professor, while PhD-holders who teach are called "university teacher". In the US I think any PhD holder who teaches is called professor, right?

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